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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
was meandering toward ending the war in afghanistan and allowing the pentagon and you have to remember when you're looking at the pentagon, you're looking at an institution that has the fine motor skills of a dinosaur. it takes the pentagon a long time to put something together, such as a timetable for withdrawal. all obama has to do, and i know it is not that simple, but i would look at the gorbachev experience. he came in 1985, he gave a speech in 1986 denouncing afghanistan as a bleeding wound. he had secretly told schultz at the military was going to get one year to turn it around. and that they wouldn't be able to. he announced a timetable, and then he was gone and 89. we need to do something similar, the military had its chances, we had 11 commanders in afghanistan in 11 years, take a look at this book by the general, which devotes a lot of attention to this. that is not a war where we can be successful. that is not in the military we have. there is no military that has ever been successful with counterinsurgency. not only that, but they have an ally in pakistan where we survived with bil
into words and the the war afghanistan and he's allowing the pentagon and you have to remember when you're looking at the pentagon you are looking at an institution that has defined motor skills and a dinosaur. if you take the pentagon a long time to put something together all but obama has to do and i know it isn't this simple but i would look at the gorbachev experience. he came out of 1985 he gave the secret speech in 1986 denouncing afghanistan to his fellow bureau colleagues as a bleeding wound he had the moxie secretly tell shultz we were getting out that the military was going to get one year to turnaround and the wouldn't feel to. they announced a timetable and they were gone. we need to do something similar. they had their chances we had 11 commanders and afghanistan in 11 years take a look at thomas rex book the generals that devotes a lot of attention to this isn't a war we can be successful and the kind of military we have. there is no military that had ever been successful in the counterinsurgency where they have a sanctuary. not only did it have a sanctuary but in outlinin
the car is gregg bergersen. he's a civilian analyst at the pentagon with one of the nation's highest security clearances. his companion is tai shen kuo, a spy for the people's republic of china. bergersen knew a secret that the chinese desperately wanted to know, and neither man knows that what they're about to do is being recorded by two cameras the fbi has concealed in their car. >> let you have the money. >> oh, oh. are you sure that that's okay? >> yeah, it's fine. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm bob simon. in this edition, we turn our attention to some foreign intrigue. first, a story about a mysterious computer virus that struck an iranian nuclear plant. later, the report of how american agents hunted a notorious arms dealer. and finally, an account of a chinese-american spy trying to steal u.s. military secrets for china. we begin with the story of stuxnet, a computer virus considered to be the world's first destructive cyberweapon. it was launched several years ago against an iranian nuclear facility, almost certainly with some u.s. involvement. but as steve kroft repor
that next paycheck may be smaller is not going over well among the troops. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr has the details. she's working the story. barbara, what's going on? >> wolf, in this town, there's nothing that causes more anxiety in budget politics than the concept of cutting the pay for the troops. but that is exactly what is on the table if congress and the president cannot reach an agreement on a spending plan. the troops usually are happy to see defense secretary leon panetta, smiles and handshakes all around. but days before he leaves office, panetta has bad news. he's proposing less money in their paycheck next year. panetta, a savvy washington operative in budget politics, is leaving it to congress to figure out how not to cut pay and keep thousands of defense employees on the job. >> we will furlough as many as 800,000 d.o.d. civilians around the country for up to 22 days. they could face a 20% cut in their salary. you don't think that's going to impact on our economy? >> but the recommendation to slow the military pay raise will put troops in the middle of t
's oil flows. lawmakers have until march the 1st to cut $500 billion from the pentagon's budget over the next decade. if they don't automatic cuts kick. in with that dangling overhead the military has had its hands tied they tell us. jennifer pentagon -- griffin is at the pentagon tonight. i know they want more money. >> that's right. it is significant in terms of the message that it sends to iran right now in a very tense time in the middle east. but it is and it is the first concrete sign that the budget uncertainty is going to have a real impact on national security. at a time when tensions are are high with iran over its nuclear program and negotiations might be coming soon, the u.s. had had a policy of having two aircraft carriers over the golf for the past two years. the uss eisenhower will deploy later this month. but it will go alone we're told to replace the uss. according to george little said facing budget uncertainty continuing budget resolution and across the board sequestration cuts made this request to the secretary and he approved. secretary of defense approved to rev
. we will be live from pentagon in a minute. >>> and falling from space, wow, pretty cool, at a rate of more than 843 miles per hour, that's how fast dare devil felix baumgartner fell when he jumped from space. the official speed has been released. even faster now than those record keepers thought at first. pretty cool stuff. >>> one of our top stories today at cnn, a secret american drone base somewhere in saudi arabia, now this is according, these are reports from two major newspapers today, saying that this u.s. launches these drone attacks against al qaeda targets from that particular base. i want to bring in two folks here at the pentagon chris lawrence also michael holmes from cnn international. chris, it's not a total surprise that this was there in saudi arabia, but certainly it was not something that they officially wanted to reveal. why are they doing it now? >> that's the big question, suzanne, why did this come out? we reported two years ago from our sources u.s. officials were telling us the cia was building an airstrip in the a arabian peninsula. it was hinted it would
scrutiny. david martin is at the pentagon. >> reporter: the use of drones to hunt and kill suspected terrorists has replaced the all-out air strikes with which the wars in iraq and afghanistan began. drones have become the first line of defense against terrorists shadowing and striking them in remote areas of pakistan and yemen. >> impact. >> i'm a big advocate of drones. >> reporter: today former defense secretary robert gates argue head that in addition to the advantage of not putting a pilot's life at risk drones cause remarkably few civilian casualties. >> first of all the numbers i believe are extremely small. and second you do have the ability to limit that collateral damage more than with any other weapon system that you have. >> reporter: critics dispute that and say civilian casualties fuel hatred of america and create more terrorists than they kill. but armed drones are only increasing in number. this helicopter drone which the navy uses for surveillance is about to be armed with laser guided rockets. giving it the capability to launch strikes from the back of ships. and th
are to buy the pentagon didn't show you any video of things that miss. that is bad pr. and the percentage of weapons that were smart weapons in the first gulf war but infinitely more than anything the iraqis had was remarkably small compared to the impression the pentagon gave them a military briefing for the alicia pictures of smart bombs and smart missiles and things fly into windows. that was the percentage actually expended. so i don't think this is a revolution in military affairs so much as a vivid demonstration of just how proficient the united states was in waging war, especially can do this proficient adversary. but it also is a military affairs in a fundamentalist about is the car still has a boat here and the ultimate goal of the conflict was a political goal and therefore the military plan made that involve smart and weapons were designed with a traditional military conclusion, which in truth is not revolutionary at all, getting the enemy to do what she wanted. i can't see it as fares. and getting assigned from the back right of time, but i do want to give -- >> yet, let randy
years, the pentagon said it can't afford to keep two aircraft carriers in the persian gulf. the u.s.s. truman would have left today from norfolk, virginia. defense secretary leon panetta blamed the cut back on is he quest ration saying if congress can't rewrite the law, things get worse. >> instead of being a first-rate power in the world, we turn into a second-rate power. that would be the result of sequester. >> you won't find this chairman arguing we need to do more with less. you'll find me arguing if that happens, we need to do less with less. >> russia will surpass u.s. defense spending in terms of overall percent of gdp in just two years. china is slated to overtake the u.s. in 2035. >> we've seen double digit increase s in chinese defense spending for more than 15 years now, and that really should not only give pause to the united states but it really should be a source of concern for the countries in the region as well. >> reporter: two years ago, then defense secretary robert gates brow beat nato allies to spent two percent of their gdp on defense. when france wanted to
the pentagon get audited and that's only fair and we don't do that. look at the last time we we reported on the record, july 2011 and june 2012 that the department of labor paid 5 billion in improper unemployment benefits so i suspect if we got 5 billion at labor in one year, i suspect the pentagon has got some issues, too, but we can't get an audit of the pentagon. >> no, i don't think there's any question about it, the $300 hammer story. there's no question every area of tit should be cut. not 12% of the of the budget and 50% of the cost of the sequester when you don't even touch entitlement spending. greta, everybody in washington knows you can't balance the budget and you can't get the spending and debt under control unless you take on entitlements. the president won't do it. and so, until he leads. and we're not going to get anywhere. >> boy it's going to be interesting to see what happens a week from now, governor. as always, nice to see you, sir. >> okay. thanks, greta. appreciate it it. >> donald trump has a warning, he's predicted a big fat explosion, we spoke with donald trump
was also inducted into the hall of heroes at the pentagon and honored with a parade. since then meyer has raised more than a million dollars to help send the children of wounded marines to college. and finally, as you have all seen, he is the author of "into the fire: a firsthand account of the most extraordinary battle in the afghan war." leading authorities is very proud to exclusively represent dakota meyer, and now i want to show you a video to hear more about dakota and his story. thank you. ♪ >> it's kind of frustrating because, you know, everyone wants to get an interview about the worst day of your life. >> it was a straightforward mission that then-21-year-old sergeant dakota meyer had been assigned that day. meyer waited anxiously by the vehicles as his team began their parol of the village on foot. as they approached, all hell l broke loose. more than 50 insurgents fired from positions on mountains surrounding the valley and from within the village. back at the vehicles, meyer heard the firing and could see into the valley. the volume of fire increased, and the radio traffic
, not to their scout leadership. >> sounds like the pentagon will be making news on this front as well, ed. >> reporter: that's right. we're told we can expect in the next few days that pentagon officials are going to announce some benefits to the same sex couples, basically, involving service members. this will involve sort of health and welfare programs, but it's important to note that it will stop at not recognizing same sex marriages between service members and either, you know, fellow service members or civilians because of the defensive marriage act prevents the government from recognizes those marriages. >> ed henry on the north lawn at the white house. good to see you. >>> lawmakers in a few states are now considering printing or minting their own money. forget about the greenback. that's a myth. virginia has other thoughts or at least some in virginia. we won't put this on all virginia ns. utah nickels, virginia dollars? we'll take a look at it. i say we get hotty-tty-totty benjamins, but that's for later. oh this is lame, investors could lose tens of thousands of dollars on their 401(k) to hi
wanted to cut the pentagon budget since talking the whew house 4 1/2 years ago. >> he was wanted to cut the pentagon since he was a state senator in illinois. he is getting his way. the left is very happy from sequestration. there are reports saying hey, we're finally cutting the defense department. as iran advances towards nuclear weapons, north korea running tests on nuclear weapons may or may not be for iran you don't want to signal to iran, hey, we're not sending aircraft carriers to the persian gulf because i negotiated something i don't like. this is very poor leadership skill. bill: what speaker bain are said to cbs and scott pelley last night he believes the white house is playing games. we'll get into that with rand paul in about 30 minutes. stuart varney was talking about "the wall street journal" report this morning saying that, even with the cuts, across the board the way they are stacked against the defense department the president still has authority as commander-in-chief to administer these cuts. is that true? >> it is. you know, everyone keeps talking about sequestration
from georgetown, serve as my chief of staff at the c.i.a. and then followed me to the pentagon as my chief of staff. and also someone who's had a public affairs at the pentagon, george little, who is also someone who both graduated and later taught here at georgetown. talented young individuals who have been at my side every day for the last four years at both the c.i.a. and the pentagon, and i am deeply grateful for their work for me and on behalf of the nation and i am deeply grateful for georgetown for training such extraordinary public servants. and speaking of extraordinary public servants, i think many in this audience know that there's a georgetown professor that the president has nominated to serve as the next secretary of defense, chuck hagel, and i am confident and i've expressed that confidence publicly that the men and women of the department of defense will have the kind of advocate they need as the nation emerges from more than a decade of war. lastly, i'm honored to be here, as i said, as a catholic and as a proud graduate of another jesuit institution, santa clara uni
get it worse? i worked in the pentagon. it would have made it a lot better. so we realized you really have to go after the people who do the work, people who do logistics, communications, pass information, do car bombs, you have to take those out. we came up with a strategy, philadelphia would love this. it is like rocky balboa and apollo creed. we'll hit them in the midsection and hit them a lot. from august of 2004 when we did 18 raids, two years, later, same month, same force, same fight, we were doing 300 raids a month. that was ten a night. now, if you stop and you say, well, ten a night, that's a lot, that's impressive. that means every raid guy on the force is going on a raid at least one raid every night. every pilot's flying one or 2:00 raids every night. and these raids are not patrols. this is not with foot, these are going in the door, somebody is getting shot. extraordinary, and to do that though you can't use previous systems. one you've got to be able to bring in this intelligence on an industrial scale. you have got to be able -- we got to the point where instead of th
return home, and i admit that when we first asked him to lead the pentagon, his answer was simple -- no. but i kept asking him. i am persistent. that is how michelle married me. i just kept at it, and it is a testament to his patriotism, to his sense of duty, that leon agreed to serve on this one last tour. perhaps it was the memory of his parents and opening their homes up to gi's added to the pacific, perhaps leon served himself, a young lieutenant in the army. perhaps it was the experience of watching his youngest son deployed to afghanistan. what we do know is this -- as our nation's's 23rd secretary of defense and every action beyond panetta has taken, every decision he has made has been with one goal in mind -- taking care of our sons and our daughters in uniform and keeping america safe. just think of the progress under his watch. because we ended the war in iraq, winding down the war in afghanistan, our troops are coming home, and next year our war in afghanistan will come to an end. we have put the core of al qaeda on the path to defeat. we have been relentless against its affi
gives us an accounting. what did the president do? >> the pentagon has announced an expansion of benefits offered to gay and lesbian couples. members of the military in same- sex relationships will receive full access to base facilities and groups, as well as joint assignments. but a number of benefits will still be denied, including health-insurance coverage and on base housing. those restrictions are expected to remain in place until the 1996 defense of marriage act is fully repealed. a federal judge has overturned a state law in arizona barring funding for the reproductive services group planned parenthood. the law banned the use of public funds by state or local government to contract with the organization that provides abortions as one of its services. in his ruling, u.s. district judge neil wake found the law unlawfully denies medicaid recipients the right to choose a medical services. in a statement, planned parenthood of arizona said -- and those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. looking at
georgetown, served as my chief of staff at the cia and followed me to the pentagon as my chief of staff. and also someone who is head of public affairs at the pentagon, george little, who is also someone who both graduated and later taught here at georgetown. talented, young individuals who have been at my side every day for the last four years at both the cia and the pentagon. and i'm deeply grateful for fore work on behalf of me and on behalf of the nation. and i'm deeply grateful to georgetown for training such extraordinary public servants. and speaking of extraordinary public servants, i think many in this audience know that there's a georgetown professor that the president has nominated to serve as the next secretary of defense, chuck hagel. i am confident and i've expressed that confidence publicly that the men and women of the department of defense will have the kind of advocate that they need as the nation emerges for more than a decade of war. lastly, i'm honored to be here, as i said, as a catholic and as a proud graduate of another just what institution, santa clara universi
the pentagon thinks they do not want or need, whether it they happen to be built in their districts. there is always plenty of room. as i understand it, the idea of the sequestration and originated with the president and his budget director, mr. lew. that is how they came up with this concept. republicans should simply let the thing become a fact. it is the only opportunity we have to make the present make any cuts at all. he seems to be so opposed to spending cuts and is only interested in finding tax and revenue. in my personal opinion, what we need to do is step back and take a look at our military and our commitments. we have bases in europe that have no reason to be there, certainly not in the numbers we are. host: we will leave it there. thanks for your call. ray locker? guest: we have a lot of military commitments all over the world. do we need to maintain a base in germany, for example? we could lessen our footprint there. there is a base on the islands in the atlantic that are controlled by portugal. we could dial that all presence there. if things get bad enough and there
, when it comes to cuts, maybe it's not as bad as the pentagon and others are warning. because he says republicans should argue that overall defense spending is still on the rise. now, cornyn admits that this is even a change for him. help said he would listen to leon panetta and others say these across the board spending cuts would be devastating. but he says he looked into it and he decided the best message for himself and other republicans, and of course this is the number two senate republican, is to say, you know what, maybe it's not going to be that bad. but as you well know, wolf, arguing that any cuts in military spending is an anthem ma to most republicans so i would imagine he's going to get some backlash on that messaging when he talks to republicans about it tomorrow. >> when it comes to gop legislation to prevent the negative impact from the sequester, what are you hearing, what's going on? >> reporter: what's going on right now is there is sort of the leading idea among senate republicans for a proposal that they will probably vote on this week. is to give the president f
the pentagon press corps for an award called the distinguished medal. he also addressed north korea's's nuclear program and the troops withdraw and afghanistan and sequestration. >> as you know, this is i believe my final press conference here at the pentagon briefing room. there are moments when i thought it was the last act of an italian opera. i'm not sure exactly when it would end and the fat lady would sing. but i think that the congress will act and they will confirm chuck hagel this week. so what i wanted to do is to use this opportunity to first of all thank you all, all of you that are part of the press corps here and the press in general. throughout my 50 years in public service, i have always believed very deeply in the role of the press. because i believe deeply in the role of the american people in our democracy, the information is the key to an informed electorate. while we may or may not agree with every story in the grand scheme of things, because of the work of the press i believe the truth always comes out. and in the end, we cannot really serve the american people well unless
during a pentagon investigation into e-mails that he had exchanged with a civilian woman who was linked to the scandal that forced the director david petraeus to resign. he has since been cleared of wrongdoing. "the washington post" reporting the general is leading service because his wife is seriously ill. a discussion on the sequester hosted by politico this morning was disrupted by protesters. they spoke out against the across-the-board cuts that go into effect on march 1st entered into an explanation by former white house chief of staff erskin bowles ms. luft -- of other cuts could be made. here is a look. >> talking backstage over talking abut the sequester that most people in the room believe will happen on march 1st as automatic cuts. mr. bowles when you have referred to them as dumb, stupid. you used that word three times to estimate a are dumb and they are stupid, stupid, stupid. look, there is no business in the country that makes the cuts across the board. you go in there and you try to search for the things that have the least at first effect on productivity. second, cutting
the pentagon as outlined a series of major spending cuts that will kick in march 1st unless the president and congress reach a spending bill to avoid sequestration. many worry is to have a devastating effect of military. our very own willis joins us now. >> at least 1 trillion. and the cells of what this would look like. perez's cat. a third reduction on aircraft maintenance, elimination of airshows. cuts in funding for army intelligence surveillance aircraft and equipment. that is something you expect. just buy more than half the number of flying hours for planes on carriers in the mideast. is really starting to get that power protected, who is out there on our behalf, how many folks are really in harm's way watching out for our interest. tracy: we talked about how technology jobs and the military will be cut. that means we're not coming up with new ideas to protect ourselves from the bad guys. >> the debate over the sequestered, as you know, which has been ongoing. the big deal with republicans, republicans him as they said yesterday, the split, the not sure what to do the arms services
of improving efficiency within the pentagon. i would say that applies to all the other agencies as well. secondly, most of the concern about sequestration is focused on readiness and training, which is absolutely true. if you talk to the lawyers that work with the defense contractors, they think they will have a field day care and some had testimony last year that the legal hassles emanating from sequestration may eat up a lot of their savings. but beyond that, there are a lot of dangerous places in the world. and what we do is try to develop capability to deal with the unknowable contingencies of what could happen at a place like syria or iran or north korea. with less money, you can prepare for future contingencies. the point is that it does not just readiness. it hurts us in the real world today. there are lots of options to deal with this. as was mentioned, the house passed bills twice last year to substitute sequestration's savings for other more targeted savings so that you save this amount of money, you're still fiscally responsible, but you don't get defense and these domestic p
security. the budget cuts known as sequestration and the pentagon and veterans were discussed on newsmakers with carol rogers, representative of kentucky on the republican side. saturday, the pb is in savanna georgia for the saturday, booktv is in savanna, georgia. al gore, the future. and at 1:30 p.m., jake tapper on his book the war in afghanistan. the savanna book festival is part of booktv this president day weekend on c-span2. >> former senator chris dodd is now part of the motion picture association of america. from the national press club, this is an hour. >> hello, i am the 106 president of the national press club and we are the world's leading organization for journalists, committed to our future through the programming and including events like this while fostering a free press worldwide. please visit our website at www.press.org. donate to a program offered to the public through the national press club journalism institute, visit press.org/institute. on behalf of our members worldwide, i would like to welcome our speaker. those of you who are attending today's event as well. our
and democrats face a march 1 deadline to avoid billions in across-the-board spending cuts. the pentagon announced it will offer benefits to same-sex couples. in the senate is wrapping up work on the violence against women act. and the house will vote on a bill requiring the president to offer a plan to balance the federal budget in 10 years. good morning. we begin with your take on the leaked white paper from the white house just fine drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. nbc news reported on the memo monday night and it has gotten lots of reaction in washington. what are your thoughts? call -- we want to get your thoughts on social media as well on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get your thoughts in a moment. first, josh gerstein is joining us on the phone. here's your headline -- what was this memo? guest: this is a white paper that looks like it was derived from some confidential legal opinions that the opinions -- opinions that the justice department wrote that authorized drones or some other counter-terrorism operations to basically killed u.s. citizens overs
the sequester in a hurry, then yes, it's a real problem because it doesn't let the pentagon begin to plan and distribute, if you will, the cuts. but at the end of the day, whether it's defense spending, education spending, health spending, what always matters more than how much you spend is how you spend it. and so i'm not, at the end of the day, all that worried about how much we spend, whether it's on defense or anything else. you just want to have the time to make some intelligent cuts rather than have to make them literally in a matter of days which would probably mean that readiness more than anything else would be cut out of the defense department account. and that's probably the one thing you don't want cut out of it. >> sam stein, you're close and yet so far away over there at the jump seat. what are the odds that the sequester actually takes place? we know the president's proposed something to push them back a while. are we going to see these kind of cuts, the ones that were outlined in the sequester proposal? >> i think the odds are pretty high, to be honest. i don't think there
. the pentagon now cutting the amount of persian gulf aircraft carriers from two to one and delaying the fueling to save money. >> and others are ramping up spending and senior fellow at the advanced studies, lt. colonel tony schaeffer joins us now. >> how are you. >> alisyn: doing well. three weeks from now, march 1st, if congress doesn't get its act together there are sweeping military cuts set to go in place and this, at the same time that we know that china and russia, in the face of two decades will outpace us with their military spending. what do you make of that? >> well, firstoff, we spend 40% of the world's budget on defense right now and i think what we have to do is fix our strategy first. one of the problems is, ali, we have had the same basic frame work since 1947 and 1947 with some adjustments in the 80's, we figure out the real threats. i always talk about the beginning with the end in mind and this is where we have an opportunity here, since we won the cold war, we're ending the wars in afghanistan and iraq, time to rethink how we focus what we do. we've noticed spending money on
accept the criticism that the pentagon should have been warning about these sooner? >> first, we started the slowdown in spending on january 10. a number of the measures that i mentioned went into effect shortly after that. significant efforts were made to slow down spending on more draconian actions later. i know that people felt we should have said more earlier. 15 months ago the secretary sent a letter to the u.s. congress saying that the effects of sequestration would be devastating. after that we testified in august and again in september, we listed every single major item we're talking about. we said that there would be cutbacks in readiness and a unit buys would go down with unit costs growing up. what we did not do was detailed budget planning. i do not regret that. if we did it 60 months ago, we would have been wrong. we would not know that congress would have changed the size and the date and we would not have incurred the tigre -- we would not have incurred the degradation route. we sounded the alarm in every way that we could. >> what kind of contract are you having with the
washington post" that we needed to reduce dod as a reason to improve efficiency within the pentagon. that applies to all the other agencies as well. secondly, most of the concern about sequestration is about readiness. which is absolutely true. if you talk about the lawyers that work as defense contractors, they believe that they will have a field day. we have even had testimony last year that the legal household emanating from sequestration making up a lot of the savings. but beyond that, as senator ayotte and senator lindsey reference, there are a lot of dangerous places in the world. but we do is try to develop capabilities to deal with the unknowable contingencies of what could happen at a place like syria or iran or north korea. with less money, you can perform with fewer contingencies. this hurts us in the real world today. my final point is there are lots of options to deal with this. as was mentioned, the house passed bills twice last year to substitute sequestration savings for other more or other more targeted savings, so the same amount of money, and these domestic progra
, there is concern of layoffs. the dimensions darpa -- you d darpa. the except the restraints on the pentagon plus those coming into play, that have negative impacts? >> we are not a big player in that space anymore. i think a little bit of catalyst is something you see in every corner of the world. whether it is europe or china or anyplace else, i did not go to one place where there is no one government at all. the private sector is still very strong here and innovative. the private sector can pick up a lot. just getting it done. the will be such a value in a just getting some of these things behind us so we can adjust to move forward. the sigh of relief is incredibly important right now. i am an optimist. it does not end with a discussion on washington. we can compete. the work force of the to this country is as good as any in the world. >> thank you for the optimistic note. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] moste church is boston's visited historic site. half a million come to the church every year because
until today to make these announcements. do you accept the criticism that the pentagon should have been we listed every major item we are talking about. we said we had to do furloughs. we said there would be cutbacks in readiness. we said unit costs would go up. all the same things. what we didn't do with a detailed budget planning and i don't regret that. we wouldn't have known the effects of the continuing resolution. we wouldn't have known that congress is going to change the size and the. moreover, we would have incurred the productivity and we would v done it six months ago, so i don't regret not doing that. i think we did sound the alarm in every way we could. >> i am wondering what kind of contract you are having with the white house and with congress there is going to have to be some. so are you trying to offer any solutions? also, i am wondering, what other things would you be doing right now if you were not spending all your time on this sequester. >> spending time with my wife -- i think i am hot the right person to answer. we are responsible for providing the nation's securi
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)